6 Ways to use Paper Bags in Speech and Language Therapy


Looking for a cheap, easy to use therapy material?  How about paper bags?  I love using paper bags for a variety of activities.  Here are some simple ways I have incorporated paper bags into my therapy sessions.

1.  Puppets
My students love to use puppets to "eat" their articulation cards or other target cards.  They also love to use them to tell stories.  Making puppets from paper bags is a great, inexpensive way to engage your students in a variety of activities!  You can easily make a puppet to match any book or story that you are using.  Be creative- your kids will love it!

I made these monster puppets with my son this week.  They were so easy to make!  We used a little paint, glue, and card stock with our paper bags.



I found the idea for these cute monsters from this pin:
Paper Bag Monster Puppets

2. Describe It To Me
This activity is also super easy.  I throw a bunch of items into a bag.  My students reach in and grab something (no peeking!) to describe.  The students remove the object and then describe it using a variety of descriptors.  This is a great way to incorporate your Expanding Expression Tool (EET) with describing real objects.  Sometimes I will even get really small, cheap objects that the students can keep if they give me a description using all of the beads on the EET.


3. What is in the bag?
This is a great activity to work on a student's deductive reasoning skills.  I put an object into the bag (students do not see- again, no peeking).  Students need to ask questions about my object.  This is similar to the game Headbanz.


4. Categories
Place pictures of categories on the bag and collect items or pictures to place in each category.  I used pictures from my Category Sorting activity.  I like to put a piece of Velcro on each bag so that I can interchange the categories without having to get a new bag each time.


5. Collect in a bag
Put any kind of card into the bag.  My students love to decorate a bag and then collect their cards.


6. Paper bag books
You can use two paper bags to make a book that will have two pockets.  Simply fold two bags in half and then put the two openings touching each other to make two pockets for a book.  Staple together, and done!  You have a paper bag book that you can use to target a variety of goals.  I used this one to put some of my new sequencing cards in for a student to take home.


I have also made these Articulation Paper Bag Books.  These are so fun to make with students and send home!


Here is a link to a freebie that contains blank frames to use on your paper bags, as well as labels for What is in the bag? and Describe It To Me.

Have fun using your paper bags!

Social Detective: Intermediate {App Review}



I was approached to review The Social Detective Intermediate app which was created by Social Skill Builder in collaboration with Pamela Crooke and Michelle Garcia Winner. This app is a follow up to the Social Detective: Beginner app, and is geared toward ages 7+.  It is meant to be a companion to the You are a Social Detective book by Michelle Garcia Winner and Pamela Crooke.  The creators describe the app by stating that it "focuses on decoding the thoughts and emotions of people students interact with day to day.  Using this information, students will make smart guesses to predict what those people might do or say next."   I had two students who were working on better understanding and reading of others thoughts and emotions, so it was perfect timing!  

This app begins with choosing an avatar for your student.  Then, the app guides you to a page with "detective equipment."  

The notebook allows students to practice being a social decoder using video clips.  They make smart guesses on the thoughts, emotions, and guesses that the characters in each video are experiencing.  There is a pretest of 42 questions.  These questions ask about the characters:
  • thoughts

  • feelings

  • making "smart guesses" 

There is then a snapshot of all of the thoughts and feelings of the character after the questions have been answered.  


The flashlight allows students to practice being a social detective by identifying what is seen or heard by a character.  


They help the character make a smart guess ad figure out what others are thinking.  
It also allows students to predict what the character will do next.
This portion of the app also has videos that students will watch to answer the same types of questions as the pretest above.  After the student correctly answers three questions, the video will continue, to show what happens next.

What did I think about the app:
I thought this was a great way to practice social understanding.  The videos provide nice opportunities for students to utilize their social thinking skills.  My students were engaged in the videos which encouraged them to really think about their answers.  I like that there are a large amount of videos to provide practice for my students.  I would love to see some more added that could include more school situations with older elementary to middle school students.

You can purchase this app at the app store (iPad only) here: Social Detective Intermediate for $24.99.  
You can also purchase this app as part of a bundle which includes Social Detective Beginner here: Social Detective Bundle for $39.99.

Disclaimer: A copy of this app was provided to me for my review. No other compensation was provided and the opinions are mine.